Programs

Gift of Compassion

The Gift of Compassion focuses on under-served and under-resourced communities, integrating ancient practices with current conditions to help bring clarity and healing into the lives of both youth and adults. The program uses art as a portal to meditation…

Healing Circles

What is healing? We have explored this question throughout 30 years of facilitating the Commonweal Cancer Help Program, decades of work in The Institute for Health and Illness, and in the Healing Kitchens Institute and the Healing Yoga Foundation—all Commonweal programs. Healing Circles was born out of the desire to expand the circle of conversation to a larger group of patients and caregivers, serving more people and empowering others to serve as well.

Commonweal Cancer Help Program

The Commonweal Cancer Help Program (CCHP) is a week-long retreat for people with cancer. Our goal is to help participants live better and, where possible, longer lives. CCHP addresses the unmet needs of people with cancer. These include finding balanced information on choices in healing, mainstream and complementary therapies; exploring emotional and spiritual dimensions of cancer; discovering that illness can sometimes lead to a richer and fuller life; and experiencing genuine community with others facing a cancer diagnosis.

Posts

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Celebrating 40 Years of Service

Forty years ago, Carolyn Brown, Burr Heneman, and Michael Lerner took an astonishing risk. They set out to build a center for healing people and healing the earth on an old RCA transmitter station on 1,000 acres of land at the edge of the Pacific.
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Summer Arts Camp Empowers Youth

For the first time in July, Commonweal hosted a week-long youth arts camp on our Bolinas site, bringing together 30 youth of diverse backgrounds to delve deeply into self-knowledge, self-expression, group bonding, and community activism.
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Community: Medicine for the Soul

Community building is one of the goals of Commonweal's Institute for the Study of Health and Illness (ISHI) programs. When we ask people what they learned in our trainings, one of the most frequent responses is, “I no longer feel I am alone.”